Dreams to Reality at TEDxExeter 2016

Each year I summarise the posts I write for TEDxExeter on the theme of the annual conference. In 2016 it was “Dreams to Reality”; in 2015 it was “Taking the Long View” ; in 2014 it was “Ideas Without Frontiers”; in 2013, “Living the Questions”; and way back in the mists of time in 2012 it was “Sustainability and Our Interconnected World”. Here belatedly are my 2016 posts.

  1. Living the dream
    An introduction to the series… Once upon a time, the Old English dream meant “joy, mirth, noisy merriment” or “music”.
  2. First a dream
    “All we need to begin with is a dream that we can do better than before. All we need to have is faith, and that dream will come true. All we need to do is act, and the time for action is now.”
  3. Dream succeeds dream
    In the UK, the dream of suffrage has been succeeded by the dream of full equality for women.
  4. “Memories, Dreams, Reflections”
    For Carl Jung, dreams were a window on the unconscious, enabling the dreamer to communicate with and come to know the unconscious, and tap into it as a source of creativity.
  5. Killing dreams
    Tread softly because you might be treading on others’ dreams… or your own.
  6. Dream world
    When you wish upon a star, you’re a few million lightyears late. That star is dead. Just like your dreams.
  7. “Einstein’s Dreams”
    In his dreams, Einstein imagines many possible worlds, set in the towns of his homeland, in the valleys of the Alps, on the banks of the River Aare
  8. Technicolor Dreamcoats
    What is your dream? Are you willing to let it upend your reality?
  9. Dreamtime
    Some individuals have forgotten the songlines. They have become alienated from the land and cannot bear too much reality.
  10. I have a dream
    Martin Luther King dreamed of a better world, and he had been to the mountaintop. And yet it wasn’t about the mountain, but about the view over the mountain to what lies ahead.
  11. Dream location
    How we can help shape the place we live, through local government and at the grass roots.
  12. Dream team
    Even in football, it is possible to have dreams of community, to play as a team instead of individual starlets.
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World Origami Day

I completely managed to miss Blog Action Day 2016 in October, but all was not lost, as I could mark World Origami Day on 11 November instead.

In modern times, origami has been used as a beacon of hope, with the tradition of folding one thousand cranes. Many fold cranes hoping for healing. Others fold them hoping for peace, so 11 November is a particularly apposite day.

Last year, I created the origami “Soul Cube” (2015) to help me reflect on my self and my activity in the world. Like many others, I have a powerful critical voice in my head, so I needed a way to access that deeper nurturing wise voice that speaks words I need to hear. This year, I offer it in the hope that others will find it fruitful.

You can download the images here and print it yourself, or contact me for a ready printed sheet. All instructions are included.

soul-cube-bothsides

Download outside image | Download inside image

1. Cut along the dotted lines
2. If you wish, decorate what will be the inside (yellow) or outside (blue)
3. Fold the square to create a cube
4. Breathe into the cube to inflate it
5. Sit with it in both hands for a time, and allow healing words and wisdom to surface from your unconscious into your conscious mind
6. On these strips of paper, write messages that your conscious mind needs to hear and remember
7. Roll up the messages and post them into the cube
8. Place the cube somewhere in view to help you remember

 

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TED and TEDx things that interest me

I’ve been the TEDxExeter Storyteller since the beginning, mainly blogging articles inspired by each year’s theme, and then live-blogging from the back of the theatre during the event itself. In 2016 I started a new series of things that interest me which have a TED or TEDx angle. These might be my responses to watching TED and TEDx talks, or interesting things that TED and TEDx talks could shed some light on…

  1. Five go to the voting booth
    Brexit and young people and how to get them to vote.
  2. Watching TED talks to know you’re not alone
    There are myriads of reasons why people watch TED and TEDx talks, and myriads of outcomes.
  3. Giving TED talks to know you’re not alone
    The benefits of collecting so many statistics on the number of times a talk is viewed and the related web pages are accessed
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The Porch Magazine

A message from Porch editor, Gareth Higgin, via me…

Don’t despair! The world might seem like it’s in crisis, but I think it’s the story we’re telling that needs the most healing. The good news is, we have some medicine!

I want to tell you about The Porch, a new magazine and community that I’m writing for – the first issue is available today!

The Porch is born out of the idea that the best criticism of the bad is the practice of the better; that beauty is the antidote to fear and violence; and that a conversation is better than a lecture. It’s a community embodying creativity, hope, and peace of mind amid a noisy, depressing, dysfunctional media landscape. If you like Third Way, The Wittenberg Door, or The Sun magazine, I think you’ll love The Porch.

The Porch lives in four ways:

  • Our magazine, published at least six times a year, committed to one thing – great writing telling a better story, making a better world.
  • Our festival, where everyone is invited to come together for a long weekend of creative conversation, music, laughter, challenge and inspiration.
  • Our online community, where we learn from and encourage each other to live hopefully, even when it seems really dark out there.
  • Surprises – subscribe and you never know what gifts await!

I’m delighted to be involved in The Porch, which brings together so many of the streams of work and passion that have been part of my life: storytelling, peacemaking, activism, laughter, and most of all, good conversation about making a better world. I’d love to have you with us.

So I’m inviting you to do two things:

1: Consider joining the conversation, by subscribing here. Subscriptions are available to anyone, regardless of ability to pay.

2: Like the Facebook page, and tell others about The Porch – we want to grow this community to make a genuine impact in our lives (and, at a time of challenge for writers and publishing, we also want to pay our writers well).

Thank you for your helping nurture a slow conversation about beautiful and difficult things. I hope that The Porch contributes to your own peace, wellbeing, and sense of community.

Clare

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